| Facts & Figures |

Tick Season is Here!

Ticks in British Columbia

There are more than 20 species of ticks in British Columbia, but only three species normally bite humans. Although the bites are sometimes painful and slow healing, there is little danger of disease as long as they are removed promptly.

Adult ticks have eight legs, unlike insects, which have six. Ticks cannot jump or fly and do not drop from trees. They require blood as a source of protein for egg development. A few simple precautions will decrease the likelihood of tick bites.

Learn more about ticks that are commonly found in B.C., how to remove attached ticks, and how to prevent tick bites at the BC Government site, here.


Lake Koocanusa

Lake Koocanusa is a reservoir in British Columbia (Canada) and Montana (United States) formed by the damming of the Kootenay River by the Libby Dam in 1972. The Dam was formally dedicated by President Gerald Ford on August 24, 1975.[1]

The Kootenai Bridge over Lake Koocanusa from the east bank.

The lake is formed north of the dam, reaching 48 miles (77 km) to the Canada–United States border and 42 miles (68 km) further into British Columbia. The lake holds 13% of the water in the Columbia River system. The town of Rexford was moved, as well as the Great Northern Railroad line. The town of Waldo, BC is now covered by the lake. What was once a barrier to river travel, Jennings Canyon is now inundated by the lake.[2]

Lake Koocanusa was named in a contest won by Alice Beers of Rexford, Montana. The name is made from the first three letters of the Kootenay (alternately, Kootenai) River, Canada, and USA.

Lake Koocanusa was built as a joint project of the U.S. and Canada. It is 26 km (16 mi) from Libby, Montana, also on the Kootenai River, from which the dam gets its name. Libby Dam has a Visitors Center and can be accessed by the Lake Koocanusa Scenic Byway which begins in the nearby town of Libby, Montana.

The Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail follows Highway 37 along the east side of the lake before crossing over the Lake Koocanusa Bridge and climbing up Webb Mountain.

**excerpt from Wikipedia**


Definition of a Campfire  

An open fire that meets both of the following requirements (as defined in the Wildfire Regulation (s.1):

(a) the open fire burns material in one pile no larger than 0.5 m in height and 0.5 m in width;
(b) the open fire is lit, fuelled or used

(i)  by any person for a recreational purpose, or
(ii)  by a first nation for a ceremonial purpose.

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